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Thursday, August 12, 2010

Finding American Naturalization Records circa 1955

Angela asked about naturalization records:
My father, Norman MacGregor Post and mother, Jane Irene Coulter Post, moved to the Williamsport, PA from Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1944. They became naturalized around 1955, having lived in Basking Ridge, New Jersey from 1948 until their deaths, his in 1977 and hers in 1999.

I remember that they had naturalization papers because they always carried them with them when we traveled to Canada in the summers to visit family relatives. After my mother's death in 1999, the papers disappeared.

I am hoping to benefit from the revised Canadian law that allows first generation Americans to recover Canadian citizenship through their parents. I need my father's (or mother's) naturalization certificate to show they were Canadian citizens when I was born in 1953. Family lore suggests that they became naturalized in 1955.

Can you help me locate a copy of his naturalization certificate.
OLIVE TREE ANSWER: Angela - A visit to the website NaturalizationRecords.com will probably answer your questions.

Basically BCIS naturalization certificate files (C-Files) include a duplicate copy of all naturalization records after September 26, 1906. C-Files include all US naturalizations from all States and Territories, and from all courts (Federal, State, and local). C-Files contain a copy of the Declaration of Intention to become a US Citizen (to 1952), Petition for Naturalization, and Certificate of Naturalization.

The C-Files are microfilmed (and indexed) so if your parents naturalized before 1956 you should be able to find them.

The records are available with a Freedom of Information/Privacy Act request to BCIS Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Go directly to Naturalizations in USA after 1906 for full details and to read what to do if they naturalized after 1956.

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